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Working Paper

Our working papers include policy-relevant material intended for academic publication. The series is edited by Pedro Carneiro and Ian Preston.

ISSN: 1742-0415

IFS Working Paper .
Not published yet - in preparation
IFS Working Paper WP201907
We find that automatic enrolment substantially increased workplace pension participation among those working for small employers by around 45 percentage points to reach 70% of targeted employees – with most, but not all, brought in at relatively low rates of pension saving.
IFS Working Paper WP19/06
Many children in developing countries grow up in unstimulating environments, leading to deficiencies in early years’ developmental outcomes, particularly cognition and language. Interventions to improve parenting in the first 3 years of life have a clear impact on these outcomes, but the ...
IFS Working Paper WP19/05
Rajasthani women typically leave school early and marry young. We develop a novel discrete choice methodology using hypothetical vignettes to elicit average parental preferences over a daughter’s education and age of marriage, and subjective beliefs about the evolution of her marriage market ...
IFS Working Paper WP19/04
Jack Britton, Neil Shephard and Laura van der Erve
Income contingent loans are an increasingly popular tool for funding higher education. These loans have desirable features, but also potentially high overall government write-offs in the long run. This latter fact has been well documented, but little is known about how those write-offs vary by ...
IFS Working Paper W19/03
Lucia Corno, Eliana La Ferrara and Justine Burns
In this paper, we exploit a policy designed to randomly allocate roommates in a large South African university to investigate whether inter-racial interaction affects stereotypes, attitudes and performance.
IFS Working Paper W19/01
Alex Armand, Alexander Coutts, Pedro C. Vicente and Ines Vilela
The political resource curse is the idea that natural resources can lead to the deterioration of public policies through corruption and rent-seeking by those closest to political power. One prominent consequence is the emergence of conflict. This paper takes this theory to the data for the case of ...
IFS Working Paper W19/02
The "annuity puzzle" refers to the fact that annuities are rarely purchased despite the longevity insurance they provide. Most explanations for this puzzle assume that individuals have accurate expectations about their future survival. We provide evidence that individuals mis-perceive their ...
IFS Working Paper No. 18-18
Eric French, John Bailey Jones, Elaine Kelly and Jeremy McCauley
In this review, we document end-of-life medical spending: its level, composition, funding, and contribution to aggregate medical spending. We discuss how end-of-life expenses affect household behavior and economic evidence on the efficacy of medical spending at the end of life. Finally, we document ...
IFS Working Paper NBER Working Paper No. 21980
James Banks, Carl Emmerson and Gemma Tetlow
This paper estimates how much additional work capacity there might be among men and women aged between 55 and 74 in the United Kingdom, given their health, and how this has evolved over the last decade.
IFS Working Paper NBER Working Paper No. 14201
In this paper we describe the history of state pension policy in the UK since the introduction of the State Pension in 1948. We calculate simple summary measures of the generosity of the system over time and of the degree to which the system has created implicit taxes on, or subsidies to, work at ...
IFS Working Paper NBER Working Paper No. 24606
James Banks, Carl Emmerson and Gemma Tetlow
We document employment rates of older men and women in the UK over the last forty years. In both cases growth in employment since the mid 1990s has been stronger than for younger age groups. On average, older men are still less likely to be in work than they were in the mid 1970s although this is ...
IFS Working Paper W18/30
Gabriella Conti, Mark Hanson, Hazel M. Inskip, Sarah Crozier, Cyrus Cooper and Keith Godfrey
Birth weight is the most widely used indicator of neonatal health. It has been consistently shown to relate to a variety of outcomes throughout the life cycle. Lower birth weight babies have worse health and cognition from childhood, lower educational attainment, wages, and longevity. But what's in ...
IFS Working Paper W18/29
Michael P Keane, Sonya Krutikova and Timothy Neal
We study the relationship between child work and cognitive development in four Low and Middle Income Countries.
IFS Working Paper W18/28
We study the effectiveness of a community-level information and mobilization intervention to reduce open defecation (OD) and increase sanitation investments in Nigeria. The results of a cluster-randomized control trial in 246 communities, conducted between 2014 and 2018, suggest that average ...
IFS Working Paper W18/27
This paper provides an empirical account of the dynamic return to work, and how this is affected by taxes and benefits.
IFS Working Paper W18/26
Rita Ginja, Jenny Jans and Arizo Karimi
We study how parental leave benefit levels affect household labor supply, family income, and child outcomes, exploiting the Speed Premium (SP) in the Swedish leave system.
IFS Working Paper W18/25
Chris Belfield and Laura van der Erve
There have been many studies of the impact of higher education (HE) on the wages and earnings of graduates. However, for working women, the variation in wages only explains 30% of the variance in net family income. To understand the overall impact of HE on the living standards of female graduates, ...
IFS Working Paper W18/24
While poverty may impair decision-making, some of the apparently irrational behaviour observed among the poor may have a rational expectation. In particular, estimates of "present-bias" among the poor may be exaggerated if poor individuals are credit-constrained and expect to have greater liquidity ...
IFS Working Paper W18/22
We examine changes in inequality in socio-emotional skills very early in life in two British cohorts born 30 years apart. We construct socio-emotional scales comparable across cohorts for both boys and girls, using two validated instruments for the measurement of child behaviour.