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Newspaper articles

Articles in newspapers and magazines written by IFS staff.
Newspaper article
How reforms to the pensions provided to public sector employees led to a £17 billion bill to rectify the incompetence of ministers and/or civil servants.
Newspaper article
The pandemic will lead us to question many aspects of the way we are governed and the way we run our economy, writes Paul Johnson. It should certainly lead us to question the dominance of Whitehall and the historical subservience of local government.
Newspaper article
Thanks to the Black Lives Matter movement, "there has been rather a lot of soul-searching going on within the economics profession", writes Paul Johnson. "I do think that we could be an awful lot better and that greater diversity would help us to be better."
Newspaper article
We need policies directly focused on job creation and supporting people - especially young people - to find jobs, writes Paul Johnson.
Newspaper article
"School closures don’t merely put progress on educational equity at risk", Paul Johnson writes, "they put at risk years of slow progress towards gender equality in the labour market."
Newspaper article
"There aren’t many upsides to the current situation", write Stuart Adam and Helen Miller. "Using it as an opportunity to fix some bits of our tax system could be a silver lining."
Newspaper article
We will have to be very smart and very lucky to get away with a swift bounce-back from the deepest recession in history, writes Paul Johnson.
Newspaper article
"We are not all in this together when it comes to the social and economic consequences of the virus and our response to it", writes Paul Johnson.
Newspaper article
When and how should the coronavirus lockdown end? "We need some framework for decision-making, not a set of opinions about the right decision", argues Paul Johnson.
Newspaper article
By the time the coronavirus lockdown ends, the government's choices "will be utterly different" to when it took office, writes Paul Johnson. "How it makes those choices could prove even more important than the immediate response to the crisis."