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Commentary

The Institute publishes a series of 'Observations', which use our research to explain the facts behind topical policy debates. IFS staff also publish articles in a variety of national newspapers, blogs and specialist magazines to help inform the public debate.

For reports and academic publications, see our publications page.

Our press releases and public finance bulletins can be found on our News page.

Latest Observations

Observation
The government has launched a consultation on whether to ban the advertising of food and drink high in fat, salt or sugar on television before the 9pm watershed. But the impact of such restrictions would depend on how firms change their advertising strategies following the ban.
Observation
On 6 March the state pension age for men and women reaches 65 and 3 months. As well as reducing government spending the increases in the female state pension age since 2010 have led to some – but not most – remaining in paid work for longer. Here we provide more detail on what the impact of the ...
Observation
Since 2000, all households containing a person aged 75 or over have been entitled to receive a free TV licence, paid for by the government. From June 2020 onwards, the government will no longer provide the funds for these free TV licences and the BBC therefore has to decide whether to continue to ...

Recent newspaper articles

Newspaper article
Today, about 1.6 million employees aged 25 and over are paid exactly at the living wage of £7.83 an hour. That's more than three times as many as were on the minimum wage in the early 2000s, soon after it was introduced.
Newspaper article
The Spring Statement is a timely reminder that the nation faces challenges beyond Brexit. Slow economic growth is expected to continue, the deficit is still some way from being eliminated, and further cuts for unprotected public services are expected.
Newspaper article
The government spends an astonishing £22 billion a year on housing benefit. That dwarfs spending on the police, on overseas aid and the budgets of many entire government departments.